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Historical Events & Related Products

Historical Events & Related Products

For 600 hundred years the Plains Indians have been pushed from their homelands, regulated and required by United States law to live on reservations allotted to them. There isn't a way to go back but by educating ourselves we can prevent "repeating history." Colonialism has not always been the feel good solution for indigenous people.

If you've ever asked yourself "How did things end up this way?", these books will help to answer that question.

February 9, 1822: The Society of the American Indians was the first national American Indian rights organization run by and for American Indians.

Feb. 28, 1823: Supreme Court Case - Johnson v. McIntosh, The Supreme Court held that private citizens could not purchase lands directly from Native Americans. The court determined that the United States government had acquired free title to the land based on the longstanding practices of European colonization and therefore Native Americans could sell their land only to the U.S. government.

Feb 8, 1887: Dawes Severalty Act: Congress enacts the Indian General Allotment Act or Dawes Severalty Act, authorizing the president of the United States to carve existing Indians lands into 160 acre parcels to be distributed to individual Native American heads of households. "Surplus lands" (those remaining after individual allotments have been made) are to be purchased by the federal government and sold to anglo-American homesteaders. Proceeds from these sales are to underwrite the "education and civilization" of the former Indian owners. Under the Dawes Act, Indians living apart from tribes are granted citizenship.

February 27, 1973: A large public meeting of 600 Indians at Calico Hall organized by Pedro Bissonette of the Oglala Sioux Civil Rights Organization and addressed by AIM leaders Dennis Banks and Russell Means was held. Demands were made for investigations into vigilante incidents and for hearings on their treaties and permission given by the tribal elders to make a stand at Wounded Knee.

On this same date, 250 Sioux Indians led by members of the American Indian Movement (AIM) converged on South Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation, launching the 71 day occupation of Wounded Knee.

  1. American Indian Policy In The Twentieth Century

    American Indian Policy In The Twentieth Century

    $24.95
    The study of government policy, at any level, is best done by hindsight. Avowed beliefs of politicians and political parties are often subject to the expediencies of the moment and the road to programmatic hell is well paved, a beautiful boulevard of good intentions. Even the most astute of scholars has a difficult time discerning how policies were formulated and put into effect. Chance and happenstance are more often the determinative factors in our lives than we would be willing to admit. Yet human societies seem to always stumble upward toward a more sublime and humane ordering of their domestic relations. Learn More
  2. The Rights of Indians and Tribes

    The Rights of Indians and Tribes

    $25.00
    The Rights of Indians and Tribes, first published in 1983, has sold over 100,000 copies and is the most popular resource in the field of Federal Indian Law. Learn More
  3. Wounded Knee 1973: Still Bleeding

    Wounded Knee 1973: Still Bleeding

    $14.99
    The American Indian Movement, the FBI and their fight to bury the sins of the past.

    On the night of February 27, 1973, beat-up cars carrying dozens of angry young men sped into Wounded Knee village. Members of the American Indian Movement (AIM) and local Lakota had come to occupy the symbolic site on the Pine Ridge Reservation, where the Army had massacred Chief Big Foot and his people in 1890. Learn More
  4. Dreams and Thunder: Stories, Poems and the Sun Dance Opera

    Dreams and Thunder: Stories, Poems and the Sun Dance Opera

    $15.95
    Zitkala-Sa (Red Bird) (1876-1938), also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was one of the best known and most influential Native Americans of the twentieth century. Learn More
  5. Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States & American Indian Nations

    Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States & American Indian Nations

    $40.00
    Treaties between the federal government and Native Nations rest at the heart of American history. The agreements provided the United States with most of the land and resources it enjoys today and they recognize the nationhood of American Indian Tribes, yet most Americans know little about them. Learn More
  6. Indian Removal - book cover

    Indian Removal

    $19.95
    Originally published in 1932 on the date of the hundredth anniversary of the arrival in Oklahoma of the first Indians as a result of the United States government's relocation of the Five Civilized Tribes, Indian Removal remains today the definitive book in its field. Learn More
  7. Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties: An Indian Declaration of Independence

    Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties: An Indian Declaration of Independence

    $25.00
    Originally published in 1974, just as the Wounded Knee occupation was coming to an end, Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties raises disturbing questions about the status of American Indians within the American and international political landscapes. Learn More
  8. Native American Testimony: 1492-2000

    Native American Testimony: 1492-2000

    $20.00
    A chronicle of Indian-White relations from prophecy to the present, 1492-2000. Fully revised and updated for the end of the millennium - the classic collection of more than 500 years of Native American history. Learn More
  9. The New Trail of Tears: How Washington is Destroying American Indians

    The New Trail of Tears: How Washington is Destroying American Indians

    $23.99
    This book reveals a much needed look into the heart breaking conditions on American Indian reservations where the policies today are devastating. Policies are denying Indians ownership of their land, refusing them access to the free market and failing to provide the police and legal protections due to them as American citizens—that have turned reservations into small third-world countries in the middle of the richest and freest nation on earth. Learn More

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